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Was Jung a Gnostic?

The short answer is no, Jung did not consider himself to be a "Gnostic."

The bottom line here is that all "Gnostics" believe in "gnosis". However, not all believers in "gnosis" are "Gnostics." Was Jung a "Gnostic?" According to Jung, the answer is no. However, was Jung an adherent to the Western concept of "gnosis?" Yes.

In order to more fully address this distinction, I'm unfortunately about to get a wee bit long, drawn out, and possibly boring. Hang in there with me...

Gnosticism
Gnosticism came into being during the first three or so centuries of AD. Gnosticism was comprised of several differing "heretical" Christ based sectarian groups that were at variance with the official, "orthodox" doctrines of the early Church Fathers of Christianity.

Whether the "orthodox" beliefs of the early Church Fathers or the "heretical" beliefs of the differing Gnostic groups were closer to "the truth" - about the nature of the world and the nature of Christ's being or essence - is not relevant for purposes of this question.

Western Esoterism
"Gnosticism" was (or is) only one member or sectarian grouping that falls under the broader, larger, more inclusive Western cultural movement, that is today monikered by most scholars as "Western Esoterism."

In Western Esoterism, despite crucial differences with one another, one of the core beliefs each historical member did (or does) share in common is the extremely broad concept of "gnosis." "Gnosis" is derived from the Greek word for "mind" (nous). "Gnosis" is, generally speaking, the gaining of direct experiential knowledge through divine inner illumination (or "God in the Psyche").

Throughout the antiquity of Western culture, some of the members of this wider religious/philosophical movement, "Western Esoterism" have included: Gnosticism, Hermetism, Hermeticism, several "heretical" Christian sects during the Middle Ages such as the Cathars, the Rosicrucians, German Theosophy, and then several New Age beliefs today.

I should point out (for purposes of avoiding a flood of emails) that many modern day Gnostics (and some scholastic writers on the subject) prefer identifying "Gnosticism" as being synonymous with what is called "Western Esoterism." That is, they include Hermetism, Hermeticism, the Cathars, and other Western Esoteric beliefs under a general, inclusive umbrella of "Gnosticism."

Simply put: "That dog don't hunt." It's just not so. (For more on this, I refer any interested readers to Gnosis and Hermeticism: from Antiquity to Modern Times edited by Roelof van den Brock and Wouter J. Hanegraaf and/or The Eternal Hermes by Antoine Faivre.)

Gnosis
To "muddy the waters" even further - there's even an even larger umbrella. These Western Esoteric movements were not the only belief systems to embrace the extremely broad and inclusive concept of "gnosis" (direct experiential knowledge through divine inner illumination - or "God in the Psyche").

Under the broad, expansive concept of "gnosis," one must also include Jesus in the New Testament Gospel of John, St. Paul in the New Testament book of Colossians, the non-Gnostic Christian writings of most early church Fathers (including Clement of Alexandria, Origen, and Augustine), and all "Platonists" (including Plato, Philo, Plotinus, and down to the neo-Platonists of the 5th century AD).

(While there were some Gnostics who - during the early centuries of AD - attempted to align themselves with the neo-Platonists, in his writings the philosopher Plotinus makes it crystal clear that they were not especially welcome members.)

Jung
Jung was, indeed, sympathetic to and interested in exploring all of the many expressions of religious faith across the world, and throughout antiquity. This included the movement now called "Western Esoterism" and the larger group umbrella of "gnosis." However, Jung's interest was primarily for purposes of gaining a better understanding of the workings of the human psyche.

In the broadest sense of the term "gnosis" (the gaining of direct experiential knowledge through divine inner illumination - or "God in the Psyche"), yes, Jung would be included. Jung's theories of the psyche might even, likewise, be considered as related to Western Esoterism. However, did Jung consider himself to be a "Gnostic" (when used in the sense of the word by his critics)? No, Jung did not consider himself to be a "Gnostic."

Summary
To sum up (make a wee bit of sense out of) what I've just explained at some length...

Gnosis - Broadest grouping or umbrella:
Under this largest and most inclusive Western umbrella (the gaining of direct experiential knowledge through divine inner illumination - or "God in the Psyche") - everyone and every group mentioned above: Jesus in the Gospel of John, St. Paul in the New Testament book of Colossians, the non-Gnostic Christian writings of most early church Fathers (including Clement of Alexandria, Origen, and Augustine), and all "Platonists" (including Plato, Philo, Plotinus, and down to the neo-Platonists of the 5th century AD), Western Esoterism groups, and then finally Jung. Each of these can be listed as adhering to the general, broad concept of "gnosis" ("God in the Psyche").

Western Esoterism - one grouping underneath the inclusive umbrella of gnosis:
This medium sized umbrella leaves out many of the above mentioned people and/or groups and is primarily comprised of Gnosticism, Hermetism, Hermeticism, (during the Middle Ages) several "heretical" Christian sects such as the Cathars, Rosicrucians, German Theosophy, and several New Age beliefs today.

Gnosticism - one small grouping underneath the medium sized umbrella of Western Esoterism:
This is the smallest umbrella consisting of the several differing "heretical" Christ based religious beliefs that were at variance with the official, "orthodox" doctrines of the early Church Fathers of Christianity.

The bottom line is that all "Gnostics" believe in "gnosis". However, not all believers in "gnosis" are "Gnostics." The bottom line on Jung is "Gnostic" - no; "gnosis" (God in the Psyche) - yes.

Also
Among other things, "much ado about nothing" is often made about a supposed “Gnostic” ring that Jung frequently wore. This is supposed to be the definitive proof that Jung was a gnostic.

However, in an interview with Miguel Serrano conducted toward the end of Jung's life, Jung explained to Serrano that he (Jung) had made slight alterations to the “Gnostic” ring, so that the symbolism contained on the ring was now (according to Jung) Christian in nature.

Suggested link:
For more on the web on the subject of Western Esoterism, I highly suggest visiting the J.R. Ritman Library Bibliotheca Philosophica Hermetica.

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